Nectar of the Gods

     When Matt Falenski, owner/meadmaker, of the Laurel Highlands Meadery received state approval for his operation in 2011 his timing couldn’t have been better. Mead is the oldest beverage known to man dating back to approximately 7000 B.C.. It is now enjoying a resurgence in popularity fueled by the wave of craft micro-breweries and their adventurous patrons. Commonly known as “Honey wine” mead is made from honey, yeast, fruit or spices depending on the style of the meadmaker. Laurel Highlands produces a full menu of mead for you to select from including: Traditional, Bochet, Maple, Hopped, Blackberry and Chocolate. Their meads come in sweet or dry table wine and dessert wine. Matt has plans for a tasting room but for now his mead can be found at All Saints Brewing Greensburg, Beaver Brewing Beaver Falls, Four Seasons Brewing Latrobe, Piper’s Pub Shiveouthside, Pittsburgh and are always available to order on his website  Laurelhighlandsmeadery.com

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About wpawinepirate

Wine lover from Western Pennsylvania that wants to tell everyone how far the winemakers here have come and what they are doing now.
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5 Responses to Nectar of the Gods

  1. Mickey Romey says:

    Mead is the labor of love.

    • I agree! You would think with mead being made for so long that there is nothing new left to do with it but that’s not the case. The new mead makers have breathed new life into it.

  2. looks interesting. the problem I’ve found with many meads, is that people screw around with them too much. Husband and I make our own and haven’t found a “flavored” mead that compares with the basic stuff.

    • I think that the meadmakers have the same dilemma that winemakers and coffee shops have in that you have to make what you can sell. The general public wants a hyped-up version of a product not a well made example of the product. Pa winemakers tell me roughly 80% of their wine sales are sweet so they make sweet to “Keep the lights on”. The dry wines have improved greatly here but only appeal to a small but growing niche market.

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